Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD)

The Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD) projects at Cal State San Bernardino's digital pl ... more

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13

September 17, 2021 01:40:56
Capstone Presentation “VIVA LA MUJER Nosotras Las Madrinas” Season 9 (2018)

Capstone Presentation “VIVA LA MUJER Nosotras Las Madrinas” Season 9 (2018)

Latina girls and women make up 1-in-5 females in the United States, and by 2060 are predicted to form nearly 1/3 of the total female population. As a fast-growing and influential constituency, Latinas have made significant strides and progress in a number of areas. Yet progress has been extremely slow and there is a long way to go to fully close gender, class, educational, and racial/ethnic disparities.    Latinas are incredibly entrepreneurial, as the number and rate of Latina-owned businesses has increased eight times that of men-owned businesses...yet, remain significantly underrepresented, especially among the Fortune 500 companies. In terms of economic (in)security, the disparities are leaving a growing portion still more likely to live in poverty and as single heads of households, still earning less in the labor market (earning less than 60 cents for every dollar a white man earns for the same job).    For decades too, Latinas have been more likely to lack health coverage among America’s uninsured, and still have the least access to health care of any group of women. In terms of civic and political leadership, Latinas have a rich history of leadership in our communities, but remain underrepresented in all levels of government.    As a group, Latina females start school significantly behind other females, and without proper support and intervention are never able to completely catch up to their peers. Latinas graduate from high school at lower rates than any major subgroup, and are also the least likely of all women to obtain and complete a college degree.    This capstone presentation will be offered by past and current LEAD events honorary chairpersons, all strong advocates/activists themselves, who have made significant contributions to our community. Affectionately known as madrinas ...

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12

September 08, 2021 00:43:13
Panel: “Latina College Administrators: Triumphs and Challenges ... Leaving a Legacy” Season 9 (2018)

Panel: “Latina College Administrators: Triumphs and Challenges ... Leaving a Legacy” Season 9 (2018)

In the United States, not only the overall growth within the Latino population, but especially increased student attendance/presence on campuses of higher education has led to an increased prevalence of social inequities. There is very few Latino representation overall within executive leadership positions in higher education, and more so, the representation of Latina (women) executives at either community colleges or four-year universities is dismal. Of those Latina executives, most serve at community colleges instead of four-year universities. Those Latinas who serve in executive positions have attained a wealth of knowledge through their experiences in leading complex institutions. It is extremely important to learn how Latinas describe their experiences and challenges while providing hope to the students they serve and within their communities.  In this session, our panelists will highlight these challenges and opportunities with regional issues at their institutions, in addition to what role race, ethnicity and gender play in our ever-changing educational and political environment. Panel Chair: - Diana Z. Rodriguez, President, San Bernardino Valley College  Panelists: - Nohemy Ornelas, Assoc. Superintendent/Vice President, Allan Hancock College, Doctoral Candidate Educational Leadership Program, Fresno State - Dr. Cynthia Olivo, Vice President Student Services, Pasadena Community College - Olivia Rosas, Associate Vice President of Student Success and Educational Equity, Student Affairs, and Doctoral Candidate-Cohort 9, Educational Leadership Program, CSUSB  This panel is date/time stamped: March 29, 2018; 1:15PM – 2:00PM Recommended Citation CSUSB - Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD), "Panel Discussion: "Latina College Administrators: Triumphs and Challenges ... Leaving a Legacy"" (2018). Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD) Video Recordings. 12. https://scholarworks.lib.csusb.edu/lead/12 ...

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11

September 01, 2021 00:41:05
Featured Speaker - Chancellor Eloy Ortiz Oakley  - “Latinx and the Community College: Promoting Pathways to Postsecondary Degrees” Season 8 (2017)

Featured Speaker - Chancellor Eloy Ortiz Oakley - “Latinx and the Community College: Promoting Pathways to Postsecondary Degrees” Season 8 (2017)

Latino/a/x have become the largest student population of color in higher education and represent 25 percent of community college students nationwide. When compared to Whites, Latino/a/x are more likely to choose a community college, even after controlling for academic achievement and socioeconomic status. Thus, upon completing high school, 46 percent of Latinx enroll in the community college sector. When entering the community college system, approximately 51 percent of Latino/a/x aspire to transfer to a four-year college, but less than 14 percent will earn a bachelor’s degree within six years of enrollment. Ultimately, 35 percent of Latino/a/x earning a bachelor’s degree are transfer students, which is the highest among other racial groups.    U.S. community colleges are complex organizations to lead. Upholding the multiple missions of the community college; responding to the nation’s developmental education crisis; addressing low completion and transfer rates; contending with dwindling, insufficient, and shifting revenue streams; (re)building relationships with board members; and operating within a culture of increased audit and accountability are but a few of the challenges with which community college leadership and faculty must grapple. Additionally, an increasing number of community college leaders and faculty now face decisions centered on the added role of conferring baccalaureate degrees.    Within this context, the discussion frames the community college as a sector that can facilitate college access for Latino/a/x students as well as a context where students, faculty, and leaders have to navigate and overcome institutional challenges to bridge degree aspirations with completions.   This panel will highlight the multiple ways in which community college Latino/a/x students and leaders respond to and challenge institutionalized obstacles in the community college pathway, levels, apprising different constituencies—from academia to policymakers to school districts—on the conditions ...

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10

August 24, 2021 00:40:07
Panel: “Access Denied: Rising Selectivity at California’s Public Universities” Season 7 (2016)

Panel: “Access Denied: Rising Selectivity at California’s Public Universities” Season 7 (2016)

Representatives from three different groups that have advocated for greater access to California higher education will discuss perspectives on this problem. The panelists include Audrey Dow, Vice President of External Affairs and Operations for the Campaign for College Opportunity, Dr. Daniel M. Estrada, Chair of the California LULAC Latino Educational Attainment Committee, and Irene Tovar, Chair of the Statewide Coalition Against CSU Impaction. Audrey Dow explains the recent Campaign report, “Access Denied: Rising Selectivity in California’s Public Universities.” This report highlights the mismatch between California workforce needs for college degrees and shortages of college seats in California’s public universities. Demand for college admission, among state high school and community college students, forced both the University of California (UC) and California State Universities (CSU) to raise admissions standards. The CSU calls this impaction. Coincidently, California reduced financial support for higher education from previous levels as federal spending, through student Pell Grants, increased. As state higher education spending decreased, UC tuition, since 2000, has increased by 200 percent and CSU tuition by 175 percent. Meanwhile California is 49th among states in the percentage of undergraduate students enrolled in a four year university – public or pbrivate not for profit. Dr. Estrada discusses how the 1960 California Master Plan for Higher Education was visionary but not sustainable. Baby boomers benefited from tuition free public universities; but later generations now pay rising tuition to attend these schools. Universal access through a three tiered system of community colleges, CSU and UC campuses no longer exists. Meanwhile, baby boomers are retiring. After review of CSUs campus endowments, these funds are small for the number of students attending yearly. Also, aside from UC flagship campuses, Berkeley and ...

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9

August 17, 2021 00:45:15
Panel: “Campaign to Promote Ethnic Studies: The El Rancho and Long Beach Models” Season 7 (2016)

Panel: “Campaign to Promote Ethnic Studies: The El Rancho and Long Beach Models” Season 7 (2016)

This presentation has been made possible by the California-Mexico Studies Center, El Rancho Unified School District and LEAD, as co-conveners of the Campaign to Promote Ethnic Studies Summit on October 18, 2014, at CSU Long Beach.    The CPES Summit was webcast by LEAD throughout its worldwide network and prompted the Los Angeles and San Francisco school districts to adopt policies similar to the historic El Rancho USD’s resolution approved in June 2014, as the first Ethnic Studies graduation requirement by a local school board in California. Since the CPES Summit, 15-20 more local school boards have adopted comparable Ethnic Studies policies throughout California, including the Santa Ana, Montebello, Bassett and Woodland school districts.    This panel will present on the progress that has been made at El Rancho USD, to build upon their landmark resolution a comprehensive Ethnic Studies curriculum, and the also precedent-setting Long Beach Ethnic Studies Program (LB-ESP) that has created a model for school districts to offer ethnic studies H.S. and college-credit courses on Saturdays. The LB-ESP builds upon the nationally recognized Long Beach College Promise relationship between the LBUSD and CSULB, supported with a 5-year funding commitment by LBUSD, to offer high school students at least 12 college-credit Ethnic Studies courses every semester.   The panelists will discuss in detail how these initiatives came about, their benefit and replicability, and answer questions related to the Campaign to Promote Ethnic Studies’ goal to promote Ethnic Studies for all students in the K-12 curriculum, throughout California and the United States.        Introduction / Moderator: - Idali Lopez, San Bernardino High School Program Specialist and SBCUSD Ethnic Studies Committee Facilitator        Panelists: - Dr. Aurora Villon, School Board President, El Rancho Unified School District - Prof. Armando Vázquez-Ramos, President, California-Mexico Studies Center - Tino Gutierrez, El Rancho ...

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8

August 11, 2021 00:32:02
“Project Inspire - Proyecto Inspire Transformando Vidas” (bilingual Eng/Span format) - Season 7 (2016)

“Project Inspire - Proyecto Inspire Transformando Vidas” (bilingual Eng/Span format) - Season 7 (2016)

The California Association for Bilingual Education (CABE) 2-INSPIRE Program works with parents to increase their knowledge about schooling to ensure that parents have vital information about high quality educational options for their children (especially those traditionally underserved and/or attending Program Improvement schools). The Project 2-INSPIRE curriculum informs parents of their role in their children’s education, works with parents so they learn how to work with the information acquired and develops parent leadership skills to ensure their participation and collaboration as part of the school community.   All three levels of the program share the same objective and goal: To increase parental engagement in their child’s learning at home, school, and/or community; and thereby increase their child’s academic achievement. However, each of the levels differs markedly in their approach, strategies, methods, activities, and outcomes for parents and their children.   The panelists are parent leaders who currently serve as officers of the Binational Parent Leadership Institute (BPLI), and as “trainer of trainers” have each passed all three levels, from awareness to mastery to expert.   Proyecto INSPIRE es un proyecto que pertenece a CABE que trabaja con los padres para aumentar sus conocimientos acerca de la escolarización para asegurar que los padres tengan la información vital acerca de las opciones educativas de alta calidad para sus hijos. El plan de estudios del Proyecto INSPIRE informa a los padres de su papel en la educación de sus hijos, trabaja con los padres para que aprendan cómo trabajar con la información adquirida y desarrolla las habilidades de liderazgo de los padres para asegurar su participación y colaboración en el marco de la comunidad escolar.   Los tres niveles comparten el mismo objetivo y meta: aumentar la participación de ...

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