Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD)

The Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD) projects at Cal State San Bernardino's digital platform with both original programming that includes replaying segments from the past decade of LEAD Summit conferences and affiliate programming that ...more

Latest Episodes

31

March 07, 2022 00:19:04
Opening Ceremony - Procession of Hope / Procesión de la Esperanza, Season 10 (2019)

Opening Ceremony - Procession of Hope / Procesión de la Esperanza, Season 10 (2019)

This segment is date/time stamped: March 28, 2019; 9:00AM This episode is a syndicated replay from Season 10 of LEAD Summit 2019. The theme that year was “¡Su Voto Es Su Voz - Everyone Counts! For the U.S. to create a positive future, it will require a Latino citizenry that more greatly participates in the American democratic process, and that is poised to shape the U.S. political landscape through voting and civic engagement. Among the Featured Speakers that year was the Honorable Alex Padilla, who at the time was serving as the California Secretary of State, and had modernized the office, increased voter registration and participation, and strengthened voting rights. Padilla served as Grand Marshall helping kick off our LEAD Summit by leading the “Procession of Hope” with Cal State San Bernardino’s first 15 graduates of its educational doctorate program, 35 brand new U.S. citizens, and 24 Dreamers and undocumented youth. The inaugural procession was emotionally overwhelming and there was not a dry eye in the room. Procession of Hope: Welcome to the 10th year anniversary of our annual Latino Education and Advocacy Days Summit - LEAD. Who are we?: The broad spectrum of researchers, teaching professionals and educators, academics, scholars, administrators, independent writers and artists, policy and program specialists, students, parents, families, civic leaders, activists, and advocates. In short, those sharing a common interest and commitment to educational issues that impact Latinos.  Over the past decades, Latinos have emerged as the largest minority in the nation, with majority populations in many states and regions, and in some cases, the majority demographic among school-age children. In many ways, this is our moment as a major cultural influence on art, ...

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30

February 23, 2022 00:53:40
Featured Speaker - Maria del Rosario “Rosie” Castro, Year:  2019  /  Season: 10

Featured Speaker - Maria del Rosario “Rosie” Castro, Year: 2019 / Season: 10

This segment is date/time stamped: March 28, 2019; 1:25PM Maria del Rosario “Rosie” Castro is a civil rights activist and educator from San Antonio, Texas, who has been involved in several prominent groups, such as the Young Democrats of America, the Mexican American Youth Organization, the Committee for Barrio Betterment, and the Raza Unida Party. She is the mother of former San Antonio mayor and U.S. Secretary of Housing Julián Castro and Texas Congressman Joaquín Castro. Growing up in the San Antonio barrio, a low-income neighborhood on the West Side, Castro cited the beginning of her interest in social justice in witnessing the racial and economic boundaries that affected her family, especially her mother. Her mother, a Mexican immigrant who reached the fourth-grade, cleaned the houses of the affluent in Alamo Heights. As a young girl, Rosie was struck by the remarkable differences -- the streets and drainage, the sidewalks and schools. The inequities she observed in her youth inspired her social activism in college and beyond. Rosie first worked as a volunteer for Lyndon B. Johnson’s 1964 presidential campaign, and later she joined with the Mexican American Unity Council and helped to organize the organization’s boycott of the San Antonio Savings Association. With a scholarship from her valedictorian title and other financial means, she successfully enrolled at Our Lady of the Lake University. As a student at Our Lady of the Lake College (BA Spanish 1971, Sociology 1975), she joined with the Catholic Youth Association and organized the Young Democrats. In 1971, she became one of the first Chicanas to run for City Council. She helped found the La Raza Unida Party and became its Bexar County chair. ...

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29

February 16, 2022 00:40:21
Opening Ceremony: “Honoring the Ancestors”, LEAD Summit VII Season 7 (2016)

Opening Ceremony: “Honoring the Ancestors”, LEAD Summit VII Season 7 (2016)

This segment is date/time stamped: March 30, 2016; 10:00AM   Opening Ceremony: “Honoring the Ancestors”, LEAD Summit VII Sacred Circles is an indigenous based performance group that incorporates Aztec/Mayan and other traditional teachings, danza, storytelling and imagery to inspire, enlighten, heal and honor the spirit of the ancestors and people of all roots. Dembrebrah West African Drum and Dance Ensemble is a collection of professional and semi-professional lay artist educators dedicated to the study, preservation and promotion of authentic West African art, culture, and history in all its power, beauty, strength and grace.   Introduction / Facilitator: - Maestro Jerry Tello, Director of the National Compadres Network, Therapist, Author, Performer and Program Developer, Recipient of the Ambassador of Peace Award and Presidential Crime Victims Service Award   Participants: - Sacred Circles: Maestro Jerry Tello, Susanna Armijo, Citlali Arvizu, Virginia ArvizuSanchez, and Victor Muñoz - Dembrebrah: Baba John Beatty, N’della Davis-Diassy, Kwesi Williams, Libretch Baker, and Hanif Riley   Recommended Citation CSUSB - Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD), "Opening Ceremony: “Honoring the Ancestors” (LEAD Summit VII)" (2016). Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD) Video Recordings. 29.https://scholarworks.lib.csusb.edu/lead/29 ...

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28

February 08, 2022 00:45:54
Panel: "Academic Collaborations in International Settings: Equity and Quality in Education  through STEM Education" (bilingual: predominantly Spanish), Season 6 (2015)

Panel: "Academic Collaborations in International Settings: Equity and Quality in Education through STEM Education" (bilingual: predominantly Spanish), Season 6 (2015)

This panel is date/time stamped: March 26, 2015, 12:05PM– 12:55PM Central Time Zone The last few decades have brought about important shifts in STEM due mostly to globalization and technological developments. These shifts have generated an eminent demand for an increase in human capital and a centrality in the STEM fields due to the shortage and negative ramifications to global economic competitiveness. One important issue is that to meet the increased demand for specialized labor, it is necessary to retain students in STEM. But unfortunately, more than 60% of those students who express an interest in pursuing a STEM major, leave without completing their intended program of study. This attrition is particularly high among racial and ethnic minority groups, including women and low-income students. Representatives of higher education in both the U.S. and Mexico share their knowledge and experience with respect to the theme of Equity and Quality in Education through STEM Education, across international settings.   Introduction: - Dr. Linda Prieto, Department of Bicultural Bilingual Studies, UTSA   Panelists: - Dr. Armando Mata Romero, Universidad Juárez del Estado de Durango, México - Dr. Angelina Alvarado Monroy, Universidad Juárez del Estado de Durango, México - Dr. Cynthia Esperanza Lima González, Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching, UTSA - Ms. Sandra Telles, La Clase Mágica after-school program - Dr. Verónica Vargas Alejo, Universidad de Quintana Roo - M.en C. José Refugio Reyes Valdés, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila   Moderator: - Dr. Guadalupe Carmona-Dominguez, Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching, UTSA   Recommended Citation: CSUSB - Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD), "Panel: "Academic Collaborations in International Settings: Equity and Quality in Education through STEM Education"" (2015). Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD) Video Recordings. 28.https://scholarworks.lib.csusb.edu/lead/28 ...

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27

February 02, 2022 00:20:00
Speaker - Maya I. Arce “Victory in Arizona”, Season 9 (2018)

Speaker - Maya I. Arce “Victory in Arizona”, Season 9 (2018)

*This segment is date/time stamped: March 29, 2018; 11:35AM PST   Maya Arce, a sophomore student at the University of Arizona majoring in computer science and a mariachi performer since the age of 7, was a plaintiff in Arce v. Huppenthal/Douglas case in the U.S. District Court (District of Arizona) and in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals for the United States, which helped lead the successful constitutional challenge to Arizona’s anti-Mexican American Studies law. While being denied the opportunity to take Mexican American Studies courses while in high school because of the state of Arizona’s elimination of the program, Maya nonetheless, in the tradition of strong Chicana educational advocates, chose to be a plaintiff in this precedent setting case. Being intimately involved in this case since 2010, Maya had remained steadfast in her convictions that studying Chicana/o history and culture is a basic human right, testifying in U.S. District Court in June 2017, “I believe in standing up for what I think is right, and I believe that I am a voice for those who otherwise may not be heard, for my ancestors, for my community members and for generations to come.”   Arizona’s anti-Mexican American Studies law was found to be unconstitutional in August of 2017 and in violation of Mexican Americans’ First Amendment and equal protection rights under the Fourteenth Amendment by the Honorable Wallace A. Tashima, Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, who noted that the state of Arizona acted with “discriminatory racial animus.”   The U.S. District Court of Northern California recently cited Arce v. Huppenthal/Douglas to allow students to move forward in their equal protection challenge to the current administration’s attempts to end the federal ...

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26

January 25, 2022 00:43:54
Panel: "The U.S. Small Business Development Center as a model of collaboration between the U.S. and Latin America" (bilingual: predominantly Spanish), Season 6 (2015)

Panel: "The U.S. Small Business Development Center as a model of collaboration between the U.S. and Latin America" (bilingual: predominantly Spanish), Season 6 (2015)

The US Small Business Development Center (SBDC) model is being implemented by over 15 countries throughout the Americas with the goal of creating a hemispheric small business assistance network that improves SME competitiveness, promotes economic development, and generates trade opportunities. The SBDC model requires the co-investment by the public, private and higher education sectors that leverage resources and promote increased program sustainability.  Representatives from Chile, Honduras and Mexico discuss the critical role of higher education institutions for implementing long-term and successful SBDC programs.  This panel is date/time stamped: March 26, 2015, 11:05AM Central Time Zone Introduction: - Dr. Patricia Sánchez, Associate Professor in the Department of Bicultural-Bilingual Studies at UTSA, and Lead Editor of the Association of Mexican American Educators (AMAE) Journal. Panelists: - Bernardo Troncoso Narváez, General Manager of SERCOTEC, Chile - Dr. Eugenio J. Reyes-Guzmán, General Director of World Trade Center, Monterrey, Nuevo León, México - Eduardo Posadas, Director of UTH Avanza Centro de Onnovación, Honduras  Moderator: - Robert McKinley, Associate Vice President for Economic Development at The University of Texas at San Antonio Recommended Citation CSUSB - Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD), "Panel: "The U.S. Small Business Development Center as a model of collaboration between the U.S. and Latin America"" (2015). Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD) Video Recordings. 26.https://scholarworks.lib.csusb.edu/lead/26   ...

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